Fruits for thought; environmental quotes

In doing research for a paper I came across some quotes that made an impact on my thoughts and really touched me. I thought I would share them.nature

To waste, to destroy our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result in undermining in the days of our children the very prosperity which we ought by right to hand down to them amplified and developed.  ~Theodore Roosevelt, seventh annual message, 3 December 1907

When the soil disappears, the soul disappears.  ~Ymber Delecto

In an underdeveloped country, don’t drink the water; in a developed country, don’t breathe the air.  ~Changing Times magazine

I’m not an environmentalist.  I’m an Earth warrior.  ~Darryl Cherney, quoted in Smithsonian, April 1990

When we heal the earth, we heal ourselves.  ~David Orr

We cannot command Nature except by obeying her.  ~Francis Bacon

I will leave you with these fruits of thought for now to blossom into action and hope.

One Hour No Power: Vote for Earth

voteearth

On March 28th from 8:30-9:30 p.m I will be placing my vote by switching off my lights, laptop and anything else that consumes power in my home in honor of 2009 Earth Hour.

It is time for all of us as global neighbors to stand up, switch off and take action! It is time to protect our home, Earth. We only have one of her, and she has taken abuse for too long. As a result climates have been changing and severe damage has occurred.

What can you do?

Join me and millions of others in turning off your lights for one hour on March 28th and visit www.voteearth2009.org to learn more about what you can do to cast your vote for Earth!

National Wildlife Week

The time has come to celebrate our wildlife!ram

When: March 16 – 20

You ask why is this post going up midway through the week? I say because it’s not too late to get involved and celebrate!

What is National Wildlife Week?

It is a time to take notice of the beauty around us and the importance of protecting and conserving what is left.It is a time to honor nature and the bounties she provides for us.

What can You do to get involved?

It’s as easy as getting outdoors! Hike, bird watch, animal watch, learn to identify a new plant; any of these and more.

You have the opportunity to not only participate yourself, but to get those around you excited as well. The National Wildlife Week website has a mountain of information and activities for all ages.

In this world we shouldn’t need a special week to commemorate what is gifted to us. Everyday should be a wildlife celebration.

So what are you waiting for?

Keeping Warm While Snoozing In The Outdoors

Snow has piled up outside, threatening to keep us from venturing outdoors. Now spring is tentatively peaking its head out, like a timid deer. Most of our winter activities are still in full swing, but my mind is wandering to warmer temperatures.

This poses the question to me, as it does every turn of the season; How do I stay warm in my sleeping bag?ss850146

There are many things we can do to aid our warmth and make our night times more comfortable. Keep in mind that there is no substitute for a quality sleeping bag. Evaluate your personal needs and when/where you’ll be sharing Mother Nature. Sleep rejuvenates us for the next day, the next hike and grand adventure. Without a good night’s sleep the next day won’t be as wonderful as it could be.

  • Before heading to bed, get your circulation flowing a bit. Do some calming yoga or march in place. This will raise your body temperature, and your sleeping bag will trap this heat.
  • Fluff your bag before climbing in, which allows for the insulation to be more evenly distributed, and it’s fun. Down bags definitely require this as the loft can get scrunched in the stuff sack.
  • Change your socks. Clean socks are more conducive to warmth and don’t stink it up. I have a pair of wool socks that are designated specifically for sleeping.
  • If you’re especially cold wear a pair of glove liners or a knit hat. I’ve been known to wear my knittie on many trips. Summers in the North West can have cold wet nights that seep into your bones.
  • Insulation beneath you is immensely important. The ground is cold and seems to radiate its iciness. A tarp under your tent and a sleeping pad will make a huge difference.
  • Other things to keep in mind: don’t go to bed on an empty stomach. A warm belly equals a warm body. The extra fuel will help maintain body temp, as will staying hydrated.
  • Use the bathroom before bed. It takes a lot of energy to keep urine warm that could be used to keep you warm. Having to crawl out of your sleeping bag and tent to stumble around in the dark is not a fun part of camping, plus you lose all that hard earned heat.
  • Stuff a jacket/sweater or extra clothes into the bottom of your bag if there’s room. The less space there is to heat, the warmer you’ll stay. I’ve discovered when doing this I put my feet on top of the extra clothes and my toes feel much cozier.

We are all built differently. Typically women are colder than men. I am a very cold sleeper, so I use all of these tactics. You may only need some or none of them.

As you climb into your sleeping bag after an evening of star gazing and campfire conversation, know your dreams will be sweeter.

See you on the trail!

Idaho’s Roadless Areas; A Natural Resource

Idaho is home to 9.3 million acres of roadless wilderness. (“ICL Latest Updates”) This wilderness is home to countless wildlife, flora and pristine waterways. Idaho’s roadless areas provide Idahoans and other outdoors enthusiasts with endless amounts of recreation.

More than 400,000 acres will soon be opened up, losing their protection to full forest uses, including logging, road construction and phosphate mining. (Barker) The plan establishes five management themes that guide timber cutting, road construction and mineral development in 250 designated areas. On Thursday, October 16th the rule was published in the Federal Register and now supersedes the 2001 Clinton rule. Jonathan Oppenheimer of the Idaho Conservation League says “The protections provided by this rule demonstrate the importance Idahoans place on our rugged backcountry. This appreciation for the land and for Idaho traditions of hunting, camping, hiking and fishing led to a plan that will ensure that our kids and grandkids have the opportunity to experience Idaho at its best.”

The 2001 rule prohibits the construction of new roads in inventoried in roadless areas and prohibits the cutting and selling of timber from these areas. (“Roadless Conservation Final Rule”) Idaho has chosen to overturn the federal regulation on multiple attempts. The new rule would allow more than 50 miles of road construction, 15,000 acres of logging and about 75 million board feet of logs to be removed over the next 15 years. (Barker) This will possibly cause irreparable damage to the environment. Causing irreparable damage is included in the original 2001 roadless rule. Other states that have tried to overturn the Clinton-era rule are Wyoming and Montana.

The roadless rule has been a source of great controversy and has raised the heads of  environmental groups. The Wilderness Society and Greater Yellowstone Coalition are among the many who protest Idaho’s idea that they can go against federal law. Even the Idaho Conservation League was originally opposed to the Idaho Roadless Rule. They have since decided that trying to find a balance was the best path. The new rule does not go without its pros and cons. Those in opposition fear that it won’t stop here, that the remaining roadless areas will be in jeopardy in the not so distant future.

A natural resource goes far beyond the definition of a material source from nature that is economically beneficial to humans. (“Definition: Natural Resource”) The value of our environment can not be measured in simple dollars and cents. There are the benefits of enjoyment, memories, strengthening relationships, and not to mention the preservation of our world for future generations. The roadless areas in Idaho are truly a natural resource that needs its people to defend it.

Works Cited

Barker. Rocky. “Green groups are split on Idaho’s final roadless rule,” Idahostatesman 17 October 2008. 11 Nov 2008 <http://www.idahostatesman.com/newsupdates/story/540788.html>

“Definition; Natural Resource.” Answers.com. 2008. 13 Nov 2008 <http://www.answers.com/topic/natural-resource>.

“ICL Statement on Idaho Roadless Plan.” Latest Updates. 14 October 2008. Idaho Conservation League. 13 Nov 2008 <http://wildidaho.org>.

“Roadless Conservation Final Rule.” Roadless USDA. 05 January 2001. US Forest Service. 11 Nov 2008 <http://roadless.fs.fed.us/documents/rule/ruledo.shtml>.

Fall Hiking Tips for the Wild Outdoor Woman

Autumn has begun to set upon us turning the outdoors into a new world. Leaves are shedding their greens for hues of golds and reds. Slowly they’ll fall to the ground and temperatures will begin to drop. Fortunately, this does not signal the end of hiking season. Fall is my favorite time of year to grab the camera and head for the hills, or the desert. Here are a few tips to make the trip even more enjoyable.

* Layers are a must! Cooler mornings still lead to warm afternoons. It is important to stay comfortable. By using a polypro, fleece, and rain shell you’ll be doing fine!

* An early start will let you get the most out of your day. Sunset creeps up on us much sooner this time of year.

* Be prepared, have proper gear. Rain, snow, heat, Mother Nature can throw anything at you.

* Sun screen and sunglasses are still important, any time of year. Just because you’re not hot doesn’t mean the sun isn’t shining down on you.

* Snacks are a must! Trailmix, jerky, whatever your favorite, keeping up your energy makes for a longer hike. This includes staying hydrated.

* Be spontaneous! Nothing is better than a spur of the moment jaunt outdoors.

* Be respectful, as always, of where you’re traveling.

* Bring a friend. Lone hiking is wonderful, but sharing it can be just as joyous.

There are many other things you can do to make your outdoor adventure more enjoyable. These will help you get on your way.

I Am An Outdoor Woman

I’ve always been a woman of the outdoors. Growing up in the mountains of north Idaho definitely lent a hand in fueling my passion. A deep appreciation of our environment and nature was ingrained in me since childhood. This is a special place, a place to cherish, to protect. A place to laugh, experience, and spend time in. As I grow so does my love for all things outdoor. In wanting to share that love along with an abundance of knowledge, Suniechick.com was born. Here you will find how to’s, recipes, environmental updates, and tales of my adventures.

I invite my sister outdoorswoman to contribute. Have a question or an experience you’d like to share? I’d love to hear it. Thankyou for visiting, and I look forward to the adventures ahead!