2010 Earth Hour On The Horizon

March 27th marks the third year of One Hour No Power, Vote for Earth!

The countdown has begun for Earth Hour 2010. I pledge once more to turn off my lights, computer, phone and anything else that eats up valuable energy.

“The movement symbolizes that by working together, each of us can make a positive impact in this fight, protecting our future and that of future generations” ~WWF

Join Suniechick, World Wildlife Fund, Alanis Morrisette, a variety of US landmarks and many other companies, countries, cities and people around the world in taking part of One Hour No Power 2010!

NWF 2010 Be Out There Resolution

National Wildlife Federation Challenges YOU to be out there, everyday in 2010!

“Go play outside” was a common phrase in my household growing up. The weather didn’t matter. Snow, sun, brisk temperatures, outdoors is where we were supposed to be. I think it was mostly to get us kids out of my mom’s hair, but a connection was being built. Now, “playing outside” is what I desire most.nature's beauty

During the time I have spent as a Girl Scout Camp Director, and as many of my friends have children of their own, I have noticed a disturbing trend. Many of these children don’t know what it’s like to run and laugh and experience the great outdoors.

I would like to challenge you, along with NWF to get you and your kids outdoors everyday. Rebecca P. Cohen took this challenge in 2009. A short walk, bird watching, gazing at the stars, fifteen minutes minimum is all it takes. Help build that relationship for your children which we have all cherished. Be out there!

Taking Out The Trash

Pack it in. Pack it out.

Walking through the forest, tree branches reach above my head creating a canopy of greens and golden hues, sunlight trickles through splattering soft pine needles beneath me. Peace overwhelms my soul, and I inhale deeply. I bend down to capture the fragrance of wild rose. At my feet I see a glitter of something. Curiosity beckons me to reach down…..

The beautiful glimmer was TRASH!   trash

Someone had carelessly tossed their garbage onto the trail. Who do they think is going to pick that up, Mother Nature? She’s not that type of mother.

Garbage mongers are NOT my friends. It is all really quite simple, pack it in, pack it out. Here are some easy tips to help in this task:

* For backpacking and hiking; carry a gallon size, freezer-duty ziploc baggie with you. This confines all your trash into one spot and contains the gooeyness. The baggie also makes for easy disposal when reaching civilization again.

* Have a dedicated stuff sack for your “trash baggie”. This helps even further in separating the garbage from everything else in your pack.

* While on the trail I use the mesh pocket in my hip belt to stuff any wrappers I may need to discard of later.

* For car camping, the gallon baggie trick works great as well. Or, we usually have a dedicated sack for trash, sometimes a few depending on how long we’re gone.

Try to remember when backpacking, or camping, to remove as much packaging as possible before heading out. This makes everything easier.

Thank you to those eco-warriors that pick up other’s trash. This is a beautiful world. It can be even better if we all work together.

~In Peace

Fruits for Thought, More Environmental Quotes

Environmental quotes always broaden my thoughts, expand my mind, contemplate and appreciate the world around me.

Here are a few quotes that I recently came upon. I hope you enjoy.skinny

When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.  ~John Muir

Man is a complex being:  he makes deserts bloom – and lakes die.  ~Gil Stern

There is hope if people will begin to awaken that spiritual part of themselves, that heartfelt knowledge that we are caretakers of this planet.  ~Brooke Medicine Eagle

Modern technology
Owes ecology
An apology.
~Alan M. Eddison

The difference between animals and humans is that animals change themselves for the environment, but humans change the environment for themselves. ~Ayn Rand

One Hour No Power: Vote for Earth

voteearth

On March 28th from 8:30-9:30 p.m I will be placing my vote by switching off my lights, laptop and anything else that consumes power in my home in honor of 2009 Earth Hour.

It is time for all of us as global neighbors to stand up, switch off and take action! It is time to protect our home, Earth. We only have one of her, and she has taken abuse for too long. As a result climates have been changing and severe damage has occurred.

What can you do?

Join me and millions of others in turning off your lights for one hour on March 28th and visit www.voteearth2009.org to learn more about what you can do to cast your vote for Earth!

National Wildlife Week

The time has come to celebrate our wildlife!ram

When: March 16 – 20

You ask why is this post going up midway through the week? I say because it’s not too late to get involved and celebrate!

What is National Wildlife Week?

It is a time to take notice of the beauty around us and the importance of protecting and conserving what is left.It is a time to honor nature and the bounties she provides for us.

What can You do to get involved?

It’s as easy as getting outdoors! Hike, bird watch, animal watch, learn to identify a new plant; any of these and more.

You have the opportunity to not only participate yourself, but to get those around you excited as well. The National Wildlife Week website has a mountain of information and activities for all ages.

In this world we shouldn’t need a special week to commemorate what is gifted to us. Everyday should be a wildlife celebration.

So what are you waiting for?

Idaho’s Roadless Areas; A Natural Resource

Idaho is home to 9.3 million acres of roadless wilderness. (“ICL Latest Updates”) This wilderness is home to countless wildlife, flora and pristine waterways. Idaho’s roadless areas provide Idahoans and other outdoors enthusiasts with endless amounts of recreation.

More than 400,000 acres will soon be opened up, losing their protection to full forest uses, including logging, road construction and phosphate mining. (Barker) The plan establishes five management themes that guide timber cutting, road construction and mineral development in 250 designated areas. On Thursday, October 16th the rule was published in the Federal Register and now supersedes the 2001 Clinton rule. Jonathan Oppenheimer of the Idaho Conservation League says “The protections provided by this rule demonstrate the importance Idahoans place on our rugged backcountry. This appreciation for the land and for Idaho traditions of hunting, camping, hiking and fishing led to a plan that will ensure that our kids and grandkids have the opportunity to experience Idaho at its best.”

The 2001 rule prohibits the construction of new roads in inventoried in roadless areas and prohibits the cutting and selling of timber from these areas. (“Roadless Conservation Final Rule”) Idaho has chosen to overturn the federal regulation on multiple attempts. The new rule would allow more than 50 miles of road construction, 15,000 acres of logging and about 75 million board feet of logs to be removed over the next 15 years. (Barker) This will possibly cause irreparable damage to the environment. Causing irreparable damage is included in the original 2001 roadless rule. Other states that have tried to overturn the Clinton-era rule are Wyoming and Montana.

The roadless rule has been a source of great controversy and has raised the heads of  environmental groups. The Wilderness Society and Greater Yellowstone Coalition are among the many who protest Idaho’s idea that they can go against federal law. Even the Idaho Conservation League was originally opposed to the Idaho Roadless Rule. They have since decided that trying to find a balance was the best path. The new rule does not go without its pros and cons. Those in opposition fear that it won’t stop here, that the remaining roadless areas will be in jeopardy in the not so distant future.

A natural resource goes far beyond the definition of a material source from nature that is economically beneficial to humans. (“Definition: Natural Resource”) The value of our environment can not be measured in simple dollars and cents. There are the benefits of enjoyment, memories, strengthening relationships, and not to mention the preservation of our world for future generations. The roadless areas in Idaho are truly a natural resource that needs its people to defend it.

Works Cited

Barker. Rocky. “Green groups are split on Idaho’s final roadless rule,” Idahostatesman 17 October 2008. 11 Nov 2008 <http://www.idahostatesman.com/newsupdates/story/540788.html>

“Definition; Natural Resource.” Answers.com. 2008. 13 Nov 2008 <http://www.answers.com/topic/natural-resource>.

“ICL Statement on Idaho Roadless Plan.” Latest Updates. 14 October 2008. Idaho Conservation League. 13 Nov 2008 <http://wildidaho.org>.

“Roadless Conservation Final Rule.” Roadless USDA. 05 January 2001. US Forest Service. 11 Nov 2008 <http://roadless.fs.fed.us/documents/rule/ruledo.shtml>.